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CGC student Jakob E. Muench wins Hamilton prize

last modified Jan 23, 2020 03:59 PM
CGC graduate student Jakob E. Muench received the Hamilton Prize for his work on graphene photodetectors for telecom applications.
CGC student Jakob E. Muench wins Hamilton prize

Jakob Ewald Muench

The University awards the Hamilton Prize to the best scientific report on the theory or practice of the physics or engineering of any aspect of communication, propagation, or signal processing, associated with electromagnetic radiation or wave propagation produced by a graduate student. The award was created by J.W.O Hamilton in honour of James Clark Maxwell.

The jury has decided to award this year’s prize to CGC graduate student Jakob Ewald Muench for his work on waveguide-integrated photo-thermoelectric graphene photodetectors for telecom and datacom applications. Jakob is also affiliated to Gonville and Caius College.

Jakob’s research on graphene-enhanced waveguide integrated photodetectors has recently been published in Nano Letters. The report awarded with the Hamilton Prize focused on this particular research, and will also pave the way to the design of new photodetectors and receivers based on graphene and related materials.

Andrea C. Ferrari, Director of the CGC, says: “We are very happy for this well deserved recognition for Jakob. His work has significantly advanced the state of the art in the field, and is at the core of the European Graphene Flagship mission.”

 

Reference

J. E. Muench et al. Nano Lett. 19, 7632-7644 (2019).

 

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