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Cambridge Graphene Centre

Research Centre on Graphene, Layered Crystals and Hybrid Nanomaterials

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The Cambridge Phenomenon

last modified Feb 01, 2017 09:35 AM
The Cambridge Graphene Centre is recognised as the heart of a rapidly developing graphene value chain in Charles Cotton and Kate Kirk’s book ‘The Cambridge Phenomenon: Global Impact."

Through its world-class research, strong industrial partnerships and entreprenurial sprit, the Cambridge Graphene Centre is leading the way in defining the graphene value chain. Research at the Cambridge Graphene Centre spans the whole chain, from production of high quality graphene and specialised graphene inks, to sensors, batteries and electronic components for the emerging Internet of Things and flexible electronics markets.

In their book The Cambridge Phenomenon: Global Impact, Charles Cotton and Kate Kirk set out the unique factors that make research and development in the city of Cambridge special. Technology emerging from Cambridge is leading the way globally, with a high impact on the UK economy. Examples of technology innovations with roots in Cambridge include gene sequencing and genomic medicine, Amazon's personal assistant system Alexa, the Raspberry Pi and Bluetooth.

Cambridge is a small city that punches above its weight. The intriguing mix of technology sectors that make up the Cambridge cluster serves as a catalyst for all kinds of exciting innovations.

Kate Kirk, co-author of The Cambridge Phenomenon: Global Impact

The Cambridge Graphene Centre's strong contribution to the graphene market is highlighted in the book, with its industrial partnerships identified as a key asset in its leadership. The Cambridge phenomenon is linked to the small size of the city and the ease of multidisciplinary collaboration due to proximity. Local companies in the graphene value chain include Aixtron, Cambridge Graphene, Cambridge Nanosystems, Dyson, Emberion, FlexEnable, Nokia Technology and Novalia. 

Click here to find out more about the Cambridge phenomenon.

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